Butterscotch Rum Ripple Cake
Yield: 12-16 servings
Butterscotch Rum Ripple Cake reinvents the classic pound cake with the addition of caramel-like swirled layers and an irresistible glaze.


For the cake:

  • 3 cups (381g) all-purpose flour (see notes for gluten-free adaptation)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 cups (384g) granulated sugar
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened
  • 5 large eggs
  • 1 cup (8 ounces) sour cream
  • 1 teaspoon (5ml) vanilla
  • 1 tablespoon (15ml) rum

For the ripple:

  • 1 package (3.4 ounce/4 serving size) dry instant butterscotch pudding mix
  • 1 (10½-ounce) jar butterscotch ice cream topping
  • 1 large egg

For the glaze:

  • ¼ cup (4 tablespoons) butter
  • ¼ cup (50g) packed brown sugar
  • 1 cup (120g) powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon (5ml) rum
  • 1 to 3 tablespoons warm water

Instructions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 325℉ and get out a 10-inch Bundt or tube pan. If Bundt pan has opening in center tube, cover with foil, but don’t spray it yet. (Helpful hint: Spray tends to roll off the sides and pool at the bottom. For easiest removal of the cake after baking, better to spray just before adding the batter.)

    If not measuring flour by weight, be sure to lightly spoon flour into measuring cup and then level off. Add the flour, baking soda, and salt to a bowl and stir to combine. Set aside.

    Add the softened butter and sugar to the bowl of a stand mixer (or use a mixing bowl and a hand beater), and beat until light and fluffy, a minute or two. Add the eggs, one at time, blending between additions. Then add the sour cream, vanilla, and rum, and blend to combine.

    Add the flour mixture to the wet ingredients in two additions, blending to fully combine. (No need to wash the bowl yet…)

    In the bowl that the flour was in, combine the ripple ingredients, and then stir in 2 cups (~17½oz/495g) of the prepared batter and beat for 1 minute at medium speed, or whisk well by hand. (Note: I do not worry about getting every drop out of the butterscotch jar. The last time I made this, I weighed it, and I used 9 ounces. Also, note that some jars of butterscotch are 12.25 ounces.)

    Spray the Bundt pan with non-stick spray. Spoon half the cake batter into an even layer in the pan (if you use a scale, this is about 475g), and then top with half the ripple batter (450g). Marble the layers with a knife – I make an S-shape once around. Repeat with the remaining batter, and marble it one more time.

    Bake for 1 hour and 10 to 20 minutes, depending on oven, or until the center is cooked through. (Helpful hint: The best way to achieve perfect doneness it to take the temperature with a quick-read thermometer; it should read between 200℉ and 205℉ in the center and bottom third of the cake.)

    Cool the cake in pan for 15 minutes, and then remove to a platter. (Helpful hint: I run a knife gently around the edges and loosely pry the cake away from the sides first.) Cool completely.

    In small saucepan, melt the butter and brown sugar over medium heat. Boil until the butter and sugar come together into one homogeneous mixture, stirring constantly. (Tip: It only takes a minute or so once the mixture boils, and you’ll see it come together into a frothy simmer.) Remove from heat. Stir in the powdered sugar and add water to achieve a glazing consistency. Drizzle over cake. (Tip: the glaze will harden quickly. If you let it sit for a minute or two too long before drizzle, simply place over a low burner and stir until you can drizzle it again, adding a trickle of water if needed to loosen.) ENJOY!

    Storage: Store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 4 days. The cake may be stored in the refrigerator for up to 7 days; just be sure to wrap well and let sit at room temperature before serving (this allows the butter to soften, as the cold butter can make the cake seem dry). The cake freezes very well too.


Notes:

Need a gluten-free recipe? A cup-for-cup, all-purpose gluten-free flour will work in this recipe. However, for best flavor and texture, I like to replace 25% of the GF flour with finely ground almond flour. (Those volume and weight measurements are 2¼ cups/285 grams GF cup-for-cup blend and ¾ cup/84grams almond flour.)


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