Shakshuka with Grains & Greens

Shakshuka with Grains and Greens --  In this twist on the traditional dish, hearty whole grains and healthy greens are added to the saucy eggs for an all-in-one weeknight meal that tastes great leftover, too.

In this twist on the traditional dish, hearty whole grains and nutrient dense greens are added to the saucy eggs, making Shakshuka with Grains & Greens a convenient, all-in-one meal that tastes great leftover, too.  

 

Shakshuka sounds complicated, but it’s really quite simple.  Pronounced “shahk-SHOO-kah,” this saucy, vegetarian meal is pantry cooking at its best.

I appreciate meals that can be pieced together with items that I typically have on hand–in this case, eggs, some form of grain (leftovers here are fair game–and helpful!), a jar of marinara sauce, and whatever greens may be lurking in my crisper drawer.

Shakshuka with Grains and Greens --  In this twist on the traditional dish, hearty whole grains and healthy greens are added to the saucy eggs for an all-in-one weeknight meal that tastes great leftover, too.

The first time I served this dish several years ago, I questioned whether my kids would be on board.  I most definitely noticed a raised eyebrow or two and forks that skeptically poked around the bowls.

I remember their surprise when they really did like it!  The pickier of my two boys actually proclaimed it delicious.  You could have knocked me over with a feather, and I’m pretty sure he surprised himself, too.

Shakshuka with Grains and Greens --  In this twist on the traditional dish, hearty whole grains and healthy greens are added to the saucy eggs for an all-in-one weeknight meal that tastes great leftover, too.

The name certainly sounds exotic (which may appeal to some kids and not others), and most kids equate sauce with spaghetti, which most definitely doesn’t have an egg on top!

I recently served this when my son had a friend over.  I hadn’t expected a guest and figured it might be a stretch, but… such a hit is was, the friend’s mom ended up requesting the recipe.

Traditionally, Shakshuka includes eggs, sauce—no greens or grains—and is spiced with chili peppers and the warm notes of cumin.  I like to keep the flavors simple with just a pinch of cayenne (I find my family enjoys the simpler flavor profile) and allow the brightness of the tomato sauce to shine. Feel free to add a 1/2 teaspoon or so of cumin or add some garlic or a chili pepper (or even sweet bell pepper) while the onion is sautéing.

This meal is hearty enough for my family of boys to get 4 servings out of it, although they do like it when I include a crusty roll or garlic bread for mopping up the sauce.  A sprinkle of fresh parsley, mint, or herbs of choice is nice when available.

Shakshuka with Grains and Greens --  In this twist on the traditional dish, hearty whole grains and healthy greens are added to the saucy eggs for an all-in-one weeknight meal that tastes great leftover, too.

Shakshuka with Grains & Greens
Yield: 2 large servings or 4 regular servings
A few key additions create a healthier, heartier twist on the traditional dish of eggs and tomato sauce...and leftovers taste great!
Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 a small onion, diced (I tend towards yellow but have used red, too)
  • 1 medium tomato, diced
  • Salt and pepper
  • 16 ounces (2 cups) your favorite marinara sauce, store-bought or homemade
  • Pinch of cayenne (optional)
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 big handful of greens, chopped (I’ve used spinach and kale)*
  • 2-3 cups cooked grains (farro, quinoa, brown rice—even lentils; leftovers work well)**
  • 2 ounces feta, crumbled, or shredded cheese of choice (I like feta; my kids enjoy cheddar and Italian blend)
Instructions

Heat the olive oil over medium heat in a 9- to 10-inch diameter pan with a high lip (and a lid) and sauté the onion until soft and fragrant, about 3-4 minutes. Add the tomato, and sauté about 2 minutes more.  Sprinkle with salt and pepper while cooking.

Stir in the sauce (and cayenne if using) and cook for a minute or two to bring to a light simmer. Fold in the chopped greens, and cook for a few minutes to wilt them.

With a spoon, make four little pockets in the sauce to which you will add the cracked eggs. Carefully crack them in (try not to break the yolks), and then sprinkle each egg with salt and pepper. (If the indentations don’t stay, it’s ok–just crack the eggs on top.)

Place the lid on the pan and cook until the whites are just set and the yolks are still runny, about 4 minutes. (I gently push on the yolks to check for doneness. If you like your yolks to be firmer, you can cook a little longer.)

Scoop the cooked grains into individual bowls for serving, and then portion the sauce and eggs overtop. Sprinkle with some cheese, and enjoy.

Notes

*An exact measurement isn’t important as the greens cook down a lot.  Feel free to go heavy if you love greens.  As an option, you could substitute zucchini or another veggie of choice.  In this case, sauté as desired before adding the sauce.

**For a twist on the usual rice and quinoa, a mix of brown rice and lentils is wonderful.  (For a really quick cooking lentil option, look for something called sprouted lentil trio by Tru Roots.)

If I have leftovers, I mix the remaining sauce and grains, and then place the leftover egg on top.  When it’s time to reheat, I remove the egg to a plate, gently heat the grains and sauce mixture, adding the egg towards the end so as not to overcook it.  Then I roughly chop the egg with my fork, add a sprinkle of cheese, mix it all up, and dig in!

 

The Fountain Avenue Kitchen https://fountainavenuekitchen.com/

 

Shakshuka with Grains and Greens --  In this twist on the traditional dish, hearty whole grains and healthy greens are added to the saucy eggs for an all-in-one weeknight meal that tastes great leftover, too.

My version of this flavorful dish was originally adapted from this recipe by Kendra Vaculin at Food52.

 

 

 

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Comments

  1. Amy Post author

    This was easy and delicious! Served with a hunk of bread to mop up every last drop of the flavorful sauce.

    Reply