4-Ingredient Low-Carb Cloud Bread


Sometimes, I post photos of in-the-works recipes on Instagram or Facebook.  If I want to do some trouble-shooting or tweaking, I might not post a given recipe here right away.  Readers will often ask, “Where’s the recipe?”, and in these cases, I typically offer to email it to those who would like to test it out.

Anytime a reader takes a moment to share feedback–whether it’s in reference to one of these in-progress recipes or one that has already been posted–I truly appreciate it.  The primary reason I held off on this low-carb option to a hamburger bun or sandwich roll is that it’s a little weird! …plus the fact that whipping egg whites is a slightly fussy step.

After receiving many positive responses from those who requested a Cloud Bread email, I figured it was time to officially share it. The recipe traces back to the 1972 Dr. Atkins Diet Revolution Book’s “Basic Diet Revolution Rolls”, with two adjustments.  The original recipe included cottage cheese and artificial sweetener.  

Readers not only praised the taste, texture, freezer-friendliness, and near absence of carbs, they appreciated it as a worthy gluten-free and diabetic option. Fittingly, I thought the feedback provided by one of the early recipe testers (thank you, Deb!) would speak quite well to the finer points of the recipe–and cast aside any questions about that one fussy step! 

So in Deb’s words: “OK, I made these last night. I have attached a picture of mine. The final verdict, I LOVE THEM. For what it’s worth here are my thoughts:

The recipe wasn’t too difficult. The hardest part was trying to whisk the egg yolks with the cream cheese. I got it pretty smooth. I still had some little bits of cream cheese that didn’t get completely dissolved but it seemed ok in the end. (From Ann: little bits of visible cream cheese are fine.) I’m not the best at folding in so I wasn’t sure how it would go, but it seemed to come out fine. Maybe not as high as the picture on your recipe, but they were cooked the whole way through and weren’t dense at all. 

As far as the taste, they were delicious. The closest thing I’ve found to white bread. A much better texture and taste then other low carb/no carb recipes I’ve tried or products I’ve eaten. Most of them are made with flaxseed flour and always come out very grainy or the store bought products are usually like eating cardboard. By this afternoon after being in the refrigerator all day, mine were substantial enough to spread peanut butter on without falling apart or tearing. I also used them this morning when I made my egg sandwich.

I will make them again and I’m anxious to try some variations such as adding some seasoning to the yolk mixture or sprinkled on top before baking, such as oregano and garlic for an Italian taste or maybe some dill or even some Parmesan cheese. Also I’m wondering if they could be frozen.”  (From Ann again…the rolls freeze very well.)

And as for the funny name, they really do look like puffy clouds!

4-Ingredient Low-Carb Cloud Bread
Use these unconventional but tasty rolls for hamburgers, breakfast sandwiches, and and the classic ham and cheese. Lightly toasting the rolls and topping with peanut butter and jam is a very good option, too.

Yield: 8-10 "clouds" (for 4-5 servings)
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  1. 3 eggs
  2. 3 tablespoons cream cheese (softened; use regular cream cheese, not low-fat or fat-free)
  3. 1 teaspoon honey
  4. ¼ teaspoon cream of tartar
  1. Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F. Grease 2 baking sheets very well or line with parchment paper. (I actually find these work best cooked on parchment that has been lightly oiled or sprayed.)
  2. Separate the eggs*, placing the whites in a large mixing bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer and the yolks in a small bowl.  Make sure no yolk mixes in with the whites.
  3. Add the softened cream cheese and honey to the egg yolks, and whisk with a fork until very smooth.  A few little pieces of visible cream cheese is okay.
  4. Start beating the egg whites on low speed.  When the whites become frothy, add the cream of tartar.  Resume beating, slowly increasing the speed to medium-high for a stand mixer or high for a handheld mixer.  Stop beating and check occasionally, and then stop beating when the egg whites form stiff peaks.  (If the eggs droop over when the beater is lifted, you're at the soft peak stage.  Beat just until the whites stand up straight without slumping.  Beating beyond this stage will cause the whites to become dry and separate; stopping at the soft peak stage will result in a batter that's too runny.)
  5. Very carefully fold the egg yolk mixture into the egg whites until combined.  Proper folding will prevent the fluffy egg white mixture from breaking down too much.
  6. Using a large spoon, scoop 8 to 10 similar size rounds onto the prepared baking sheets.  The rounds should be roughly 3/4-inch thick and 4 to 5 inches across.  Adjust them gently with the spoon. You can make different shapes (like oblong), if preferred.  Just try to keep the size and thickness consistent.
  7. Bake on the middle rack for approximately 25 to 30 minutes. (If you can't fit your baking sheets on the same rack, rotate them midway through the cooking time.)  Cooking times will vary based on oven, so be sure to watch closely.  The tops should be golden brown and the buns should not feel mushy when lightly pressed in the center.
  8. Once cooked, cool completely.  Store in a single layer in a zip-top bag or airtight container in the refrigerator overnight. (If stacked, the rolls will stick to each other.)  As the bread rests, the texture will improve and the egg flavor will lessen.  I find that the flatter side--the side that was touching the baking sheet--works better as the part of the roll your hands touch when using as a sandwich roll.
  1. Eggs will separate more easily when cold but will beat to a higher volume when room temperature. I like to separate the eggs when I put the cream cheese out to soften and let them sit at room temp until ready to proceed.
The Fountain Avenue Kitchen http://fountainavenuekitchen.com/
Nutrition Facts (based on 2 rolls/5 servings)
 Amount Per Serving:
 Calories -- 63
 Calories from Fat -- 42
 Total Fat 4.7g
 Cholesterol 105mg
 Sodium 55mg
 Potassium 43mg
 Total Carbohydrates 1.5g
 Sugars 1.4g
 Protein 3.8g
 Vitamin A 4% • Vitamin C 0%
 Calcium 2% • Iron 3%

If you notice any hint of crumbliness–similar to cooked meringue–upon removing from the oven, this will disappear once the rolls have been cooled and then stored overnight in a plastic bag or Tupperware container. (Store in a single layer.) The end result is a soft texture that has a hint of chewiness.


The next time around, I plan to try this recipe with almond butter in place of the cream cheese.  I’ve also been thinking that a 1/2 cup or so of shredded cheddar cheese or 1/4 cup of grated Parmesan (with the original cream cheese version) would be a nice addition.  If anyone does the experimenting before I do, please comment below. 😀


For extra tips on how to beat egg whites, click HERE. 

how to beat egg whites



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  1. Jeanne Zuidema

    I’m a sugar wheat & flour addict in recovery. Back in the 1970’s while on Atkins I flourished on the egg white no sugar (or sugar substitute) cream of tartar “bread”, Thanks for sharing. Happy trails to you and yours always. ❤❤

    1. Ann Post author

      Thanks for your comment and glad this bread offered a walk down memory lane. : ) Good luck to you as your continue your recovery, Jeanne.

  2. Linda

    Does anyone have the original bread recipe from Dr. Atkins original book? If so please emai it to me. If you know the title of the book it was in originally please include the name and year of that book. Thanks!!!

    1. Ann Post author

      Hi Linda,
      I mentioned it above: “…the 1972 Dr. Atkins Diet Revolution Book’s “Basic Diet Revolution Rolls”, with two adjustments. The original recipe included cottage cheese and artificial sweetener.” Perhaps you can find a copy of the original book online.

  3. Dr.Marlene D.Williams

    I was getting very tired of trying to find a low carb recipe for a bread that cooked through and was edible. Thank you! The batter didn’t rise, but it was not only done, it tasted pretty good and didn’t crumble apart when sliced. I look forward to trying more of your recipes that you have so generously put on this site. Thanks

    1. Ann Post author

      I’m so glad you enjoyed this and appreciate your comment. You are right, this batter doesn’t rise when baked. It’s almost as though baking locks in the “rise” that is created through whipping the egg whites. Hope you find more recipes that you like as well!

    1. Ann Post author

      If you put the mixture into a loaf pan, you may have trouble cooking it through. Also, while the texture is really good, it’s different than the typical sliced loaf. If you’d like a different shape, say for a hoagie, you can easily make an oblong or other shape. I hope that helps!