Healing Ginger Tea

 Healing Ginger Tea -  Simmer a potful of this delicious elixir at the first sign of a sore throat or stomach woes.  Soothing, therapeutic, and 100% caffeine-free.

Simmer a potful of this delicious elixir at the first sign of a sore throat or stomach woes. Healing Ginger Tea is soothing, therapeutic, and caffeine-free and can be easily adjusted for those who enjoy a little extra zing.

 

Once a week, I take a Pilates class with my dear friend Carrie.  We’ve been doing this for quite a few years now, and sometimes I think it’s more fun and friend therapy than it is exercise. (Actually, it’s really good exercise, but that’s another story!)

Every single morning, Stacey, our awesome instructor, sips from a steamy mug of ginger tea. Somewhere along the line, her deliciously therapeutic practice rubbed off, and I started making it at home.

During cold and flu season, however, ginger tea pulls double duty.

Ginger has long been considered a natural anti-inflammatory that also helps with nausea, circulation, stomach cramps and bloating. Additionally, it improves the absorption of nutrients and naturally neutralizes toxins in the digestive system.

Beyond that impressive list, ginger has long been known to reduce symptoms of the common cold and alleviate sore throat pain.

Somewhere along the way, I started adding a cinnamon stick to the simple brew. This warm spice add appealing flavor and color, as well as its own list of health benefits.

Loaded with anti-oxidants, cinnamon boasts its own anti-inflammatory properties and is believed to help fight bacterial and fungal infections. Additionally, studies have shown that cinnamon lowers blood sugar levels and may reduce heart disease risk factors.

 Healing Ginger Tea -  Simmer a potful of this delicious elixir at the first sign of a sore throat or stomach woes.  Soothing, therapeutic, and 100% caffeine-free.

Note that while all cinnamon is considered to have health benefits, Ceylon, which is considered “true” cinnamon, is preferred over Cassia, as the latter contains a compound called coumarin that may be harmful in large doses.

A final drizzle of honey adds a welcome hint of sweetness along with its own set of antioxidants and antibacterial and antifungal properties. It’s sore throat soother, too.

The strength of this tea comes down to personal preference. I like it strong enough to taste some of ginger’s peppery spice.

Too much ginger, however, can be off-putting. Luckily, this is easy to remedy. If the tea tastes too strong, dilute it with hot water to taste. The honey will balance the flavor, too.

Conversely, if you go too light on the ginger, you can simmer the mixture a few minutes longer, adding an extra slice or two to ratchet up the flavor. And then add a little more ginger the next time.

 Healing Ginger Tea -  Simmer a potful of this delicious elixir at the first sign of a sore throat or stomach woes.  Soothing, therapeutic, and 100% caffeine-free.

Delicious enough to drink daily, my kids have long welcomed a mug of this warming tea and consider it helpful medicine when suffering from a cold.

Interestingly enough, Stacey, my ginger tea-drinking friend and Pilates instructor, used to simply pour the hot water over a lot of ginger slices. When she took a few minutes to simmer the ginger in the water first, she found she got far more flavor with far less ginger.

Finally, a shout out to my son⇩⇩ who not only adores this tea but is always happy to hold a mug or plate for a photo when he’s home. ❤️

The guy who graciously holds the mug :-)
 Healing Ginger Tea -  Simmer a potful of this delicious elixir at the first sign of a sore throat or stomach woes.  Soothing, therapeutic, and 100% caffeine-free.

Healing Ginger Tea
Yield: 1 large or two smaller servings (recipe can easily be doubled or tripled)
Simmer a potful of this delicious elixir at the first sign of a sore throat or stomach woes. Healing Ginger Tea is soothing, therapeutic, and caffeine-free and can be easily adjusted for those who enjoy a little extra zing
Ingredients
  • 1/2 to 3/4 ounce (15-17 grams) sliced fresh ginger* (about 5-6 quarter sized slices)
  • 1/2 a cinnamon stick, optional
  • 2 cups water
  • Optional for serving: honey (I like a teaspoon per cup), a squeeze of lemon or lemon slices
Instructions

Place the ginger and water in a medium saucepan.  (I prefer to slice the ginger into coins instead of grating or mincing it.  The prep is quicker and the slices can be removed at the end with no need to strain.)

Bring the water to a boil, cover the pot, and then reduce the heat and simmer on low for 15 minutes.  Remove from the heat.

Remove the ginger, pour the tea into one or two mugs. and add honey and lemon (optional) to taste.

Optionally, the tea can be served cold. In this case, let the tea cool, store in the fridge, and add ice cubes, if desired, before serving.

Notes

*You don’t have to peel the ginger (it won’t taste bitter), but many people prefer to do so. The easiest way is to scrape off the skin with a spoon.  Once you find your preferred amount of ginger, a kitchen scale is helpful to replicate precisely every time. For example, 17 grams is perfect for my family. Feel free to increase or decrease to taste.

A few more things...

If you’d like to experiment with additional flavors, you could add some mint leaves, a pinch of turmeric and/or cayenne pepper. Or try adding a few drops of peppermint oil, which is thought to ease upset stomachs and sore throats when consumed with warm tea.

For extra healing power and a stomach soother, I like to place a drop or two of honey on the cooked ginger slices and eat them. It’s sort of like candied ginger!

The Fountain Avenue Kitchen https://fountainavenuekitchen.com/

 

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Comments

    1. Ann Post author

      They’re such a treat, right? I know I’d love your chai, Ann, and the ginger syrup sounds wonderful, too!

      Reply