Classic Peach Jam

Classic Peach Jam

There is something special about homemade jam.  The smell of fruit cooking is sweet and delicious and the aroma truly takes me back to my grandmother’s kitchen.

As someone who lived through The Great Depression, my grandmother always served bread with dinner as an inexpensive filler.  It was simple sandwich bread–we called it “jelly bread”–and her homemade jam made it taste like a million bucks!

For a few extra jam-making tips, click on this link to my Classic Strawberry Jam recipe.

Classic Peach Jam
Yields 7 cups.
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Ingredients
  1. 3 pounds peaches, peeled, pitted and finely chopped
  2. 5 1/2 cups sugar
  3. 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  4. 1/2 teaspoon butter
  5. 1 box fruit pectin (I use Sure-Jell)
Instructions
  1. Place the peaches and lemon juice into a large pot. At this point, I like to take my potato masher and mash the peaches a bit.
  2. Measure the sugar into a separate bowl and set aside. Stir the package of pectin into the peaches and add the butter.
  3. Stirring frequently, bring the peach mixture to a full rolling boil (a boil that does not stop bubbling when stirred), then add the sugar. Stir to fully incorporate.
  4. Return the mixture to a full, rolling boil and boil for exactly 1 minute, stirring constantly.
  5. Remove the pot from the heat.
  6. Skim any foam from the surface.
  7. Ladle quickly into clean jars. (I like to use a wide funnel.)
  8. Wipe the rims of the jars with a clean cloth.
  9. Place the heated lids (lids that have been placed in simmering water for at least a minute) on the jars and tighten the bands.
  10. Place the jars in a canner and process (gently boil) for 10 minutes (water should cover the jars by an inch or two--add boiling water, if necessary), then remove the jars from the canner.
  11. Cool completely before storing. Make certain all lids have sealed properly before storing. If the lid springs back when pressed in the middle, it is not sealed and should be stored in the refrigerator.
Notes
  1. If you prefer to skip the processing step, simply store your jam in the refrigerator or freeze.
The Fountain Avenue Kitchen http://fountainavenuekitchen.com/
The aroma as the fruit cooks is divine and the process is not complicated. Simply follow the easy steps.

The aroma as the fruit cooks is divine and the process is not complicated. Simply follow the easy steps.

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Comments

  1. Terra

    It is funny, I am always amazed at how simple, but time consuming canning is. I seriously thought canning was so hard. Now that I know the truth, it is time for me to go for it. I didn’t know i could bypass the boiling portion, how long would the jam last in cooler or freezer, do you know? Looks fantastic! Hugs, Terra

    Reply
    1. Ann

      Hi Terra,
      It truly is simple! If I get all the jars, lids, sugar, etc., organized ahead of time, the process is that much easier. The jam will last for many months if frozen, weeks in the fridge. My grandmother used to melt paraffin wax (sold near the canning jars) and pour enough over the jam to completely seal, then screw on the lid. The wax hardens and can be popped off prior to eating. She would reuse all sorts of old jars this way and save herself the hot water bath step. It makes an air-tight seal and the jars can be stored at room temperature. I almost forgot about this until someone mentioned it recently. So, you could try that! Let me know if you have any questions! xo

      Reply
  2. Tara

    I love this recipe Ann and will be making some next week! The peaches are beautiful here and I LOVE peach jam! Thank you for sharing this! xoxoxo

    Reply
    1. Ann

      Good question, Ani! The small amount of butter actually helps to reduce the foam on the surface. You may omit, if desired.

      Reply
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  5. Mark

    Hi Ann, Just saw this post and was wondering how long will the jam store for? Is there a way to make this recipe for someone who is diabetic? My father-in law loves peaches and I know he would love this. thank you.

    Reply
    1. Ann

      Hi Mark,
      There is a low-sugar Sure-Jell that is available. I have not used this but have heard good things about it. You would simply need to follow the directions on the package. I have seen other recipes using chia seeds as a thickener, but have not experimented with that yet. If you have any other questions, please let me know…I hope this helps!

      Reply
    2. Ann

      …and I almost forgot to mention, when canned and sealed, the jam will keep in a cool, dark place for at least a year. Refrigerated, it will keep for quite a number of weeks…several months if unopened.

      Reply
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  7. Kim

    I’m thinking of tossing in a split and scraped vanilla bean pod and a splash of Maker’s Mark bourbon. Whiskey Peach Jam just sounds good.

    Reply
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    1. Ann

      There is probably an amazing aroma wafting through your kitchen by now, Claudia! I can’t wait to hear how you make out with the jam and the shrimp!

      Reply
  9. Beverley

    You make it look so easy and tasty , love your recipes and I wish there were more hours in the day and more mouths to feed at my table. love you xoxo

    Reply
    1. Ann

      It’s always a treat to see a message from you, Beverley! Thanks for the sweet comment and love you right back!!

      Reply
  10. Tara

    Hello from Manitoba…I am not fond of canning (as yet),can I follow the steps in making this jam but keep in the fridge and use it quickly?you make it look mouth wateringly delicious that I want to try making some..Thank you!!!

    Reply
    1. Ann

      Hello from Pennsylvania and absolutely to keeping the jam in the fridge, Tara. I have actually stored unopened, unprocessed jars in my fridge for quite a while as a test, and the taste and color kept very well. Even the opened jars last for quite a few weeks if you make a habit of only using clean utensils to dip into the jar, etc. Hope that helps and that you have a chance to try!

      Reply
  11. Patti

    If you pour your boiling peaches into the jars immediately, you don’t need the water processing. They will seal and last for at least a year. I’ve canned this way for 40 years.

    Reply
    1. Ann

      That’s the way I learned from my grandmother, Patti. The only reason I don’t suggest it here is because the method doesn’t conform to current safety guidelines. Thanks for taking the time to mention!

      Reply
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    1. Ann Post author

      So glad you like it, Cyndy! An accurate amount of fruit is the key to the jam setting up properly, which is why I specify weight instead of cups in the ingredient list. For those who don’t have a kitchen scale–which is probably a lot of people!–I recommend weighing the peaches at the store. Hope this helps for the next time!

      Reply
        1. Ann Post author

          Hi Grace, I’ve only used the powdered pectin. I would look on the package to see if there’s an equivalent for the powdered option. My guess it that there will be and that it could be used instead.

          Reply