Cheater Shrimp Ceviche (no raw seafood!)

Jump to recipe
Cheater Shrimp Ceviche (no raw seafood!) - Healthy, refreshing and perfect as an appetizer or light meal, this easy-to-make recipe uses a blend of citrus to hit all the right flavor notes 

Healthy, refreshing and lovely as an appetizer or light meal, this easy-to-make Shrimp Ceviche recipe incorporates a blend of citrus to hit all the right flavor notes…and no raw seafood!🍤

 

 

 

Is it “se-vish” or “se-vish-ay”…or “seh-vee-chay?”

When the mercury is soaring and you serve this light, refreshing dish, I’d venture to say nobody will care how you pronounce it. (Although it might be a fun topic of conversation around the dinner table!)

However, according to most Spanish dictionaries, ceviche is pronounced “seh-vee-chay,” and because the dish heralds from Peru, this pronunciation is considered appropriate.

But what exactly is this dish?

Cheater Shrimp Ceviche (no raw seafood!) - Healthy, refreshing and perfect as an appetizer or light meal, this easy-to-make recipe uses a blend of citrus to hit all the right flavor notes 

Ceviche (which is also referred to as cebiche, seviche or sebiche) is a seafood dish that originated in Peru, as mentioned, but its light, fresh flavor and health appeal has made it popular in many other countries as well.

It’s typically made from very fresh, raw fish that is “cooked” in citrus juices, such as lemon or lime, and flavored with chili peppers or other seasonings including chopped onions, salt and cilantro.

Because the dish is not cooked in the traditional sense, freshness is vital. My preferred method of preparation, however, eliminates the risk of food poisoning from raw seafood by starting with cooked shrimp.

Cheater Shrimp Ceviche (no raw seafood!) - Healthy, refreshing and perfect as an appetizer or light meal, this easy-to-make recipe uses a blend of citrus to hit all the right flavor notes 

Ceviche is usually accompanied by side dishes that complement its flavors, such as sweet potato, lettuce, corn, avocado, mango or plantain. I like to stir avocado into the ceviche just before serving, as it unifies the flavors and texture of the ceviche beautifully.

Though often served as an appetizer, the addition of avocado makes the ceviche satisfying enough to be a light meal. Its light, cool qualities offer added appeal on a hot summer evening.

Cheater Shrimp Ceviche (no raw seafood!) - Healthy, refreshing and perfect as an appetizer or light meal, this easy-to-make recipe uses a blend of citrus to hit all the right flavor notes 

My family and I first enjoyed ceviche while on trip to Costa Rica several years ago, and it is quite popular throughout the Pacific coastal regions of Latin America. While I mentioned that Peru is generally credited as being the birthplace of ceviche, many countries contest that claim. (Sort of like the hot debate over who invented the whoopie pie—Maine or Pennsylvania?!)

Although not all traditional recipes use orange, lemon and lime juice (many use only lime juice), I prefer a combination. The citrus trio adds complexity, and the inclusion of orange juice, specifically, softens the acidic bite of the lemon and lime and makes the “broth” that lingers in the bowl when all the shrimp is gone truly drinkable.

In that regard, I find ceviche to be refreshing in a way that reminds me of gazpacho. (Maybe because I often add seafood to my gazpacho to make it a more filling meal.)

As with so many age-old ethnic dishes and family recipes, there are endless variations on the dish; there’s truly no right or wrong way to make ceviche.

Feel free to adjust the portions somewhat, going a little light on the cucumber or tomato if you prefer less veggies and more shrimp, for example. Or try mango in place of the tomato and jicama instead of cucumber.

Served with chips for scooping, ceviche is a fun appetizer. But as mentioned, we also enjoy it as a refreshing dinner salad when it’s hot outside. Though not traditional, a side of rice or quinoa is a delightful way to soak up the flavorful juices and add wholesome heft. (Or you can slurp up the remains of this healthy tonic once the ceviche is no more!)

Cheater Shrimp Ceviche (no raw seafood!) - Healthy, refreshing and perfect as an appetizer or light meal, this easy-to-make recipe uses a blend of citrus to hit all the right flavor notes 

Easy shrimp ceviche is a stellar way to enjoy garden fresh produce in a light, all-in-one meal. No cooking required and advance prep adds convenience.

Cheater Shrimp Ceviche (no raw seafood)
Yield: 8 appetizer or 4 entrée-size portions
Healthy, refreshing and perfect as an appetizer or light meal, this easy-to-make recipe uses a blend of citrus to hit all the right flavor notes-and no raw seafood!
Ingredients
  • 1 pound cooked shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • ½ cup (120ml) freshly squeezed orange juice*
  • ¼ cup (60ml) freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • ¼ cup (60ml) freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1 cup diced vine-ripened tomatoes**
  • 1 cup diced cucumber (seeds removed; could substitute jicama or diced peeled apple)
  • 1 jalapeño pepper, seeds and minced***
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro (may substitute 2 or so tablespoons fresh snipped chives)
  • ¼ cup minced red onion
  • 1 avocado, pitted and diced
  • Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground pepper
  • For serving: tortilla chips, tostadas or partially hollowed-out avocado halves
Instructions
  1. In a small bowl, whisk together the orange, lemon and lime juice. Set aside
  2. Chop the shrimp into ½-inch pieces and transfer to a large nonreactive bowl.
  3. Add the tomatoes, cucumber, jalapeño, cilantro and red onion to the shrimp. Pour in the juice mixture, and then toss the ingredients to combine. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or up to 4 hours.
  4. Just before serving, season the ceviche with salt and pepper to taste (I use about ¼ teaspoon of each) and then fold in the avocado.
  5. Serve chilled with tortilla chips for scooping, on a tostada or even in a partially hollowed-out avocado half. It’s not traditional, but you could also serve the ceviche over rice or a grain of choice to soak up the flavorful juices. Ceviche is best enjoyed the day it’s made, but leftovers of this cooked variety will technically keep for 3-4 days in the refrigerator. That said, for best texture, we try to consume any leftovers the following day.
Notes

*I recommend against using lemon, lime or orange juice from a container. Freshly squeezed is necessary for best results. (Even though it may be especially tempting to just pour from the jug of OJ in the fridge!)
**Any good seasonal tomatoes may be used. “Meatier” tomatoes like plum work well, but sweet grape tomatoes could also be used. If using a larger slicing tomato, simply remove the seedy clumps and drain off any excess juice.
***If you enjoy a little heat, reserve some of the seeds and add them to the ceviche to taste. Or you may add a squirt of your favorite hot sauce.

The Fountain Avenue Kitchen https://fountainavenuekitchen.com/

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *