Homemade Lip Balm (Happy Chappy)

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For its creamy texture and ability to effectively coat chapped lips, this homemade balm has long been my favorite chapstick. It makes a fun project and a great gift, too. 

For its creamy texture and ability to effectively coat chapped lips, this homemade balm has long been my favorite chapstick. It makes a fun project and a great gift, too. 

 

 

 

 

Several years ago, the younger daughter of a good friend decided she wanted to start a business. Libby was 16 at the time and decided homemade lip balm would be popular with friends and family alike.

She discovered lip balm was easy to make and could be sold for a low price, while still offering a reasonable markup. She was trying to make some money after all!

Libby modeled her lip balm after a popular, all-natural product manufactured by Burt’s Bees, and with a short list of ingredients made what soon became my favorite chapstick.

Initially, I purchased the homemade balm as a supportive gesture. I loved her entrepreneurial spirit and creative touches. I was already a fan of the product on which she modeled her lip balm, and I didn’t expect to like a homemade version more.

Libby’s product, however, was less waxy and creamier than the store-bought option, which meant it coated my lips better. The light peppermint scent made applying the chapstick all the more appealing. 

An added bonus I discovered in the COVID era is that, unlike traditional lipsticks and glosses, the lip balm doesn’t stain the inside of a mask shades of berry and wine!

Libby even came up with a name I adored – Happy Chappy. What’s not to love?

Libby is now in college and has put her business on the back burner for the time being. When she could no longer keep her customers stocked with her healing lip balm, she graciously shared the recipe with me. She even said I could use her clever name.

Before I made my first batch, Libby shared her best chapstick-making tips and gave me her blessing to share all of it with my readers.

My family adores this chapstick as much as I do. It makes a fun project and a great gift. (I do find that teenage boys generally prefer the more austere label-less look, while girls seem to appreciate the clever name and a cute label!)

The ingredient list is short, and the necessary items can be purchased at craft stores like Michael’s or online. The tubes are not expensive, and few tips assure they are easy to work with. That said, you could use little tins or pots designed for lip balm or even recycle small containers you may have at home.

So, with thanks to Libby, I give you Happy Chappy.

For its creamy texture and ability to effectively coat chapped lips, this homemade balm has long been my favorite chapstick. It makes a fun project and a great gift, too. 

 

Buying information:

Conveniently, there are a few options. Coconut oil can be purchased at the grocery store. I found everything else at the local Michael’s arts and crafts store. (I do suggest calling before you go, as some of the stock was running low when I went. However, I asked and was told these ingredients are on the regular order rotation.) For those who prefer to stay home or would like a wider variety of product choices (or would simply like a visual of what you need), online buying provides an alternative and I have included links below:

  • Beeswax pastilles or pellets (white or yellow)
  • Coconut Oil (virgin, unrefined)
  • Shea Butter (100% unrefined shea butter)
  • Peppermint Essential Oil
  • Chapstick Tubes  (These come with labels; can use a small jar or tin and use your finger for application.)
  • Plastic pipettes or dropper (makes filling the tubes much easier!)
  • A double boiler or a heat-proof canning jar and a small pot
  • Rubber band – You can buy racks to hold the chapstick tubes upright, but I found that binding them together with a large rubber band does the trick. (shown several photos down)

Labels:

I have gone label-less and have also used the labels that came with my chapstick tubes and a Sharpie. For those who prefer something fancier, you may look to online options like this one.  

 

For its creamy texture and ability to effectively coat chapped lips, this homemade balm has long been my favorite chapstick. It makes a fun project and a great gift, too. 

The ingredients are minimal and widely available at craft stores and online. I’ve included links to the products I have used, above.

For its creamy texture and ability to effectively coat chapped lips, this homemade balm has long been my favorite chapstick. It makes a fun project and a great gift, too. 

You begin by melting the beeswax, shea butter, and coconut oil in a double boiler or glass bowl set over a pot of simmering water, stirring constantly until melted. Helpful hint: I’ve found that placing a heat-proof canning jar in a pot of simmering water also works really well, as it keeps the ingredients in a concentrated area, making transfer of all of it easier later.

For its creamy texture and ability to effectively coat chapped lips, this homemade balm has long been my favorite chapstick. It makes a fun project and a great gift, too. 

Plastic pipettes or a dropper will make the transfer of the melted lip balm into the tubes mess-free and easy. I also discovered that banding the tubes together with a rubber band ensures the bottles stay upright and eliminates the need for a special rack.

For its creamy texture and ability to effectively coat chapped lips, this homemade balm has long been my favorite chapstick. It makes a fun project and a great gift, too. 

If the melted mixture starts to firm up before it’s completely transferred to the tubes, simply return to the heat until fully melted again. When finished, let the tubes sit at room temperature for several hours until cooled and firm before capping. The lip balm will be somewhat soft for the first day but will fully set up once it has set overnight.

For its creamy texture and ability to effectively coat chapped lips, this homemade balm has long been my favorite chapstick. It makes a fun project and a great gift, too. 

Labels are cute but not necessary. Online printing options for labels are widely available. I’m not particularly crafty, however, so I used a Sharpie to neatly write on the labels that came with the tubes. Stored in a cool, dark place, the chapstick will last for a year or two and is fun to share with friends.

For its creamy texture and ability to effectively coat chapped lips, this homemade balm has long been my favorite chapstick. It makes a fun project and a great gift, too. 

One batch yields 12 standard size chapstick tubes, although little chapstick pots or even tiny recycled jars could be used instead.

 

Homemade Lip Balm (Happy Chappy)
Yield: 12 standard size chapstick tubes (could use little tubs or tiny jars instead)
This lip balm really works. It’s smooth, creamy, and naturally nourishes dry, chapped lips. For added appeal, the light aroma of peppermint blends with the tropical undertones of coconut. That said, you could absolutely experiment with different scents or go fragrance-free. It makes a fun project and a great gift, too. 
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons beeswax pastilles*, white or yellow
  • 2 tablespoons shea butter
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 40+ drops peppermint essential oil (could sub scent of choice or a mix of two**)
  • Equipment: chapstick tubes (or small tins/tubs); pipettes or dropper for easy transfer of melted ingredients; rubber band
Instructions
  1. Melt the beeswax, shea butter, and coconut oil in a double boiler or small glass bowl set over a small pot of boiling water, stirring constantly until melted. Helpful hint: I’ve found that placing a heat-proof canning jar in a small pot of simmering water works really well, as it keeps the ingredients in a concentrated area, making transfer of all of it easier later. (Make certain to use a canning jar, as the jar will likely break if not heat-proof.)
  2. Remove the pan from the heat but keep it over the hot water to prevent the mixture from firming up too quickly.
  3. Add the essential oil until you like the amount of scent. Tip: You can test a small amount of the mixture on your arm to make sure the scent is to your liking.
  4. Once the essential oil has been added, use the pipette or a dropper to fill the lip balm tubes. I fill the tubes right up to the top. The lip balm will contract slightly as it cools, so it’s fine if the mixture is slightly domed above the top edge of the tube. (Helpful hint: I use a rubber band to hold the tubes together, which keeps them from tipping over during the transfer. Special racks are available, but the rubber band trick works well. See photos.) This must be done quickly since the mixture will start to harden as soon as it is removed from the heat. Tip: if this happens, you can briefly return the pot to the heat to melt it once again.
  5. Let the tubes sit at room temperature for several hours until cooled and completely hardened before capping them. The lip balm will be a little soft for the first day but will fully set up once it has set overnight.
Notes

*Use an extra teaspoon or two of beeswax if you prefer a firmer lip balm or slightly less if you prefer a softer balm. As is, the lip balm is perfect for me – it’s creamy and coats nicely without squishing when you use it. If you’re striving for a particular texture, you can put a few drops of the melted mixture on a piece of parchment paper and let it harden in the refrigerator for a quick test before transferring the remaining mixture to the tubes.

**For the scent, I stick with peppermint, although Libby has used orange and a combination of orange and peppermint, which is quite nice, too. I think spearmint and other citrus flavors would be appealing, and adding vanilla to any of these scents would likely be lovely, too.

The Fountain Avenue Kitchen https://fountainavenuekitchen.com/

 

 

 

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