Spring & Summer Avocado Toast

a simple twist makes this protein-rich meal refreshingly delicious and extra easy.

Just when you thought you couldn’t love avocado toast more…a simple twist makes this protein-rich meal refreshingly delicious-and extra easy.

 

 

 

Easy is good, right?

Many of the meals I regularly prepare and enjoy in my kitchen involve simple assembly more than outright cooking. Recipes also have a way of evolving over time.

Such is the case with this easy plate. It’s an offshoot of an old avocado toast recipe that my family has enjoyed countless times over the years at every hour of the day. It’s healthy yet decadent, easy yet elegant, and provides a super speedy meal at the drop of a hat.

No doubt, avocado toast has become popular in chic cafes and with Millennials far and wide. Consisting of nothing more than crisp toast covered in a layer of mashed avocado, it’s oddly appealing. Slivered radishes and pea shoots are often used as pretty garnishes, although a protein-rich fried or poached egg is often the topping of choice to keep hunger at bay.

After making a big batch of deviled eggs a few years ago, I repurposed some of the leftovers on avocado toast, using them instead of a cooked egg. The utter convenience led me to use plain old hard boil eggs for the same purpose.

Now, when the weather warms, I find myself shifting away from the fried egg and boiling a pot of these complete little protein sources to have on hand. Because it’s so easy and satisfying, I get in a rut with this meal, enjoying it day after day, sometimes for breakfast but often for lunch and occasionally dinner.

Spring & Summer Avocado Toast — A simple twist makes this protein-rich meal refreshingly delicious-and extra easy.

As mentioned, the only real difference between this and my more traditional avocado toast recipe is the method of egg preparation. And who would have thought that the texture and temperature of a hard boiled egg would offer such a delightful alternative to a cooked egg as the days grow longer?

As an added bonus, the use of boiled eggs creates convenience. A single effort at the stove yields a stash for the week (I love this easy-peel method⇩⇩), rendering mealtime a cinch.

Easy Peel Eggs -- Perfectly cooked eggs with shells that slip right off are easy with this simple technique.

For years, I had an egg slicer in my kitchen drawer and rarely used it. If Marie Kondo had worked her magic in my kitchen several years ago, it would have been long gone!

Thanks to this effortless meal, however, I now put it to good use and have gotten my money’s worth. I purchased my slicer years ago at a now-shuttered home goods store, but it’s similar to this OXO model (pictured below) that retails for $9.99.

As mentioned, mincing by hand works well, too. The egg slicer is simply a fun and effective option.

OXO egg slicer
Spring & Summer Avocado Toast — A simple twist makes this protein-rich meal refreshingly delicious-and extra easy.

This piece is sprinkled with dukkah, an aromatic fusion of nuts, herbs, seeds and spices. Egyptian in origin, dukkah complements vegetables, pasta, rice, a variety of meats and-as I’ve discovered-eggs!

Tip: Have a leftover portion of avocado and don’t want it to brown? Store it in a bowl with a wedge or slice of onion and cover with plastic wrap. ⇩⇩  No need to place the wrap directly on the avocado. The “gasses” from the onion will keep the avocado green. It’s magic. You must try it! Works for guacamole, too.

Ever wonder about the freshness of your eggs? Here’s an easy way to test:

  1. Place the egg in a bowl of water.
  2. If the egg lays on its side at the bottom, it’s still quite fresh.
  3. If the egg stands upright on the bottom, it’s fine to eat, but should be consumed soon, or hard boiled.
  4. If the egg floats to the surface, it’s past its prime and best discarded.

Why does this method work?

Eggshells are porous, and over time, air passes through the shell into the egg. Over time, the freshness of the egg diminishes as more air enters the shell. The air also creates the buoyancy.

Spring & Summer Avocado Toast — A simple twist makes this protein-rich meal refreshingly delicious-and extra easy.

Perfect when the weather is warm and you don’t want to cook-but you still have to eat! A simple salad or fruit complements nicely. My favorite pairing is a side of vine-ripened tomatoes.

Spring & Summer Avocado Toast
Yield: 1 serving (easy to multiply for as many servings as needed)
A simple twist makes this protein-rich meal refreshingly delicious-and extra easy.
Ingredients
  • 1 slice whole grain bread (use gluten-free if needed)
  • 1/3 -1/2 of a ripe Haas avocado (precise amount depends on personal preference and size of avocado)
  • 1 hard boiled egg, peeled and minced*
  • Kosher salt and black pepper to taste
  • Optional extras: hot sauce or salsa; slice of vine-ripened tomato; ham, cooked bacon or smoked salmon; fresh basil and/or chives
Instructions

Toast the bread (I like it crunchy both for the texture and ease of eating by hand), and then spread with the avocado. (I lightly mash it with a fork, but you can slice it if preferred).

Spread the minced egg evenly over the avocado, sprinkle with salt, pepper and any optional extras. You may prefer to place some of the optional toppings, like the tomato or smoked salmon, under the egg instead of on top.

*If you happen to have an egg slicer, you can make quick work of mincing an egg by slicing it once, turning 90 degrees and slicing again. For an extra fine mince, you can carefully rotate the egg 90 degrees from bottom to top and slice on more time.

Notes
The Fountain Avenue Kitchen https://fountainavenuekitchen.com/

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Comments

  1. Heather Jane

    That onion tip for avocados and guacamole is great! I can hardly wait to give it a try. Thanks Ann—I always learn something from your posts.

    Reply
    1. Ann Post author

      I’m so glad, Heather. Thank you! And I can’t wait for you to try this. The first time I ever tried this trick, I kept on telling my sons they could eat the leftover guacamole “tomorrow”…and then I would say tomorrow again because I wanted to see how long it remained green. I think I made them wait 3-4 days and it was still looking good!

      Reply