Baked White Rice

By Ann Fulton

Baked rice is easy, foolproof, and hands off. Plus, it works with white and brown rice – the only thing that changes is the cooking time.
Jump to Recipe

Baked rice is easy, foolproof, and hands off. Plus, it works with white and brown rice – the only thing that changes is the cooking time.

 

I’ve practically given up cooking rice on the stovetop because baking it is easier. The oven method is also foolproof and hands off. As a bonus, a few simple seasonings mean the rice tastes just as good on its own as it does mixed into stir fries, curries, burrito bowls, and more. 

Of note, the recipe works with white and brown rice – the only detail that changes is the cooking time. That said, for brown rice I prefer this reliable and somewhat novel stovetop method over the Baked Brown Rice by a small margin.

If cooking with kids or simply preferring a hands-off method, however, baked rice wins every time. And for white rice, baking is the winner either way. 

There are so many ways to put leftover rice to use over the week ahead (this Chicken Fried Rice readily comes to mind), so don’t miss my tip for preventing leftover rice from drying out, which I’ve included below the recipe card. 

 

 

Baking rice involves the quickest of prep followed by a relatively short stint in the oven, and the result is light and fluffy grains with no clumps.

The lowdown:

  • First and foremost, there’s no need to rinse.
  • Start by placing the rice in an 8-inch square (or similar size) baking dish. No need to grease the pan either.
  • But do add a tablespoon of butter or olive oil. (I’ve even used duck fat.) This adds flavor and ensures that the grains fluff up without sticking once cooked.
  • I like to add salt so the rice tastes great on its own, but you could skip it. Once you try the basic recipe, you could also experiment with other herbs, spices, and add-ins.
  • Bring the water to a boil and then measure and add it immediately to the baking dish. 
  • Give the rice a quick stir (this will help melt the butter if using).
  • And then quickly cover with foil, making sure the dish is sealed tightly. We don’t want the steam to escape.
  • When the rice is cooked, remove from the oven and let it rest, covered, for 5 minutes.
  • Fluff thoroughly with a fork and enjoy!

A photo step-by-step:

Baked rice is easy, foolproof, and hands off. Plus, it works with white and brown rice – the only thing that changes is the cooking time.

Add the rice, butter or olive oil, and salt to a baking dish. You may omit the salt if watching sodium or using with something for which no additional salt is desired. The seasoning, however, makes for rice that tastes great on its own. Do not omit the butter or olive oil, as the small amount makes for separate, fluffy grains once cooked. 

Baked rice is easy, foolproof, and hands off. Plus, it works with white and brown rice – the only thing that changes is the cooking time.

Boiling water is then added to the dish.

Baked rice is easy, foolproof, and hands off. Plus, it works with white and brown rice – the only thing that changes is the cooking time.

The boiling water will melt the butter, if using. After the water is added, give it a quick stir…

Baked rice is easy, foolproof, and hands off. Plus, it works with white and brown rice – the only thing that changes is the cooking time.

…and immediately seal tightly with foil.

Baked rice is easy, foolproof, and hands off. Plus, it works with white and brown rice – the only thing that changes is the cooking time.

When done, remove from the oven and let the rice rest, covered, for 5 minutes. Then remove the foil, being careful of the hot steam, and fluff the rice thoroughly with a fork.

Baked rice is easy, foolproof, and hands off. Plus, it works with white and brown rice – the only thing that changes is the cooking time.

Tender, fluffy, flavorful grains every time…and so easy!

Baked White Rice
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Yield: 6 servings (about 4½ cups)
If you haven’t baked your rice, you’re going to love this. It’s easier and more foolproof than the stovetop method, and it’s hands off. Plus it works with white and brown rice – the only thing that changes is the cooking time.
Ingredients
  • 1½ cups (270g) white rice, medium or long grain (Basmati works well too)
  • 1 tablespoon (14ml) olive oil or butter
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt*
  • 2½ cups (20oz) water
Instructions

Preheat the oven to 375℉.

Place the rice in an 8-inch square or other 1½-quart baking dish. No need to grease. Add the olive oil or butter and salt.

Meanwhile, boil water in a tea kettle or covered saucepan. When the water boils, immediately pour 2½ cups over the rice, stir to combine, and cover the dish tightly with foil. Bake on the middle rack of the oven for 25 minutes for slightly firmer rice or 28 minutes for more tender rice.

(Tip: The first time you cook rice this way, taste a few grains at the 25 minute mark. If they are a touch firmer than you like, quickly reseal the foil and bake for a few minutes longer. Over time, I have steered towards the softer, fluffier grains produced by a slightly longer cook time, but check so you know. )

Remove from the oven and let sit, covered, for 5 minutes. Then remove the foil, being careful of the hot steam. Fluff the rice thoroughly with a fork and serve.

Storage: Leftovers may be refrigerated for up to 5 days, or completely cooled and frozen for up to 6 months.

Notes

*The salt adds a lovely hint of flavor, although you may omit if watching sodium.

More On YouTube More on Instagram
Tried this recipe?Post a picture on instagram and we will repost it! Mention @fountainavenuekitchen or tag #fountainavenuekitchen!
The Fountain Avenue Kitchen https://fountainavenuekitchen.com/

Trick to prevent leftover rice from drying out

Great tip prevents leftover rice from drying out!

To keep leftover rice tender, fluffy, and moist: Wet a paper towel and then wring out the excess moisture. Place the paper towel over the rice, and then seal the dish with plastic wrap – or use an airtight container – and refrigerate up to 5 days. For an added moisture infusion when reheating, I wet and wring the paper towel again and then drape it over the surface of the rice before warming in the microwave. 

A fun nutrition fact from our dietitian Emily:
Which is healthier- white or brown rice? They each have their pros (and cons!) and so incorporating any kind of rice as part of a varied diet is healthful. For example, brown rice does contain more fiber, but it also contains more arsenic, which is absorbed from the soil into the outer husk. For those adults eating varied diets, the amounts of arsenic we eat in rice are negligible and are not harmful.  But, just like most foods – eating either type of rice in excess portion sizes, or frequency, is not beneficial for a wide variety of reasons. 

For those who are curious…
The reason we don’t list nutritional breakdowns next to each recipe is because the numbers can change significantly depending on brands people buy and how exact the measuring is. In saying that, if you email me separately, I can provide you with my best estimations on the nutrients you would like to know more about in this recipe. I’m happy to help! 

 

Leave a Reply

Make it? Rate the recipe:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comments

  1. Brenda Haines

    I used Jasmine rice for this and saved the leftovers in meal size containers in the freezer. The rice that has been frozen is as good as when first cooked. My husband says it is the best rice he has ever had. We are seniors and dishes like this are good for us. Easy to make with leftovers to use with other meals.

    Reply
    1. Ann Post author

      I’m so happy to read your comment, Brenda. I’m delighted the rice has been a convenient and reliable recipe for you and appreciate your feedback.

      Reply