Cuppa Cuppa Cuppa Cobbler

Cuppa Cuppa Cuppa Cobbler --  sweet peaches, a novel yet easy preparation, and those crispy edges make this seasonal dessert a perennial favorite!

With a layer of melted butter, batter, and fruit, this simple “Cuppa Cuppa Cuppa Cobbler” strays from the typical two-layer cobbler with fruit on the bottom and a crumble or biscuit on top. Then, as this cobbler bakes, the batter rises up and over the peaches and forms a cakelike treat, the edges of which become lightly crisped by the melted butter.

fresh peaches

August 22 is my dad’s birthday.  So when I read recently that this dog day of summer is also “National Eat a Peach Day,” I knew he’d appreciate the fitting overlap.

Though my dad has never done much cooking, in many ways he’s the person who taught me to eat with the seasons.  While Mom typically made the weekly grocery runs, Dad was a Central Market regular, bringing home an ever-evolving rainbow of produce for all to enjoy.

Peach season—his favorite—called for special runs to Cherry Hill Orchards.  I asked him recently when he began these weekly trips, and he told me he first went for apples 40-some years ago, when the store was located on New Danville Pike.

When the “new” store was built 34 years ago on the corner of Long Lane and Marticville Road, he added peaches to his seasonal shopping list.  (For the record, Dad called to verify the date!)

So while Dad’s birthday and National Eat a Peach Day are a couple weeks away, I’m sharing his favorite peach cobbler recipe now, for those who, like Dad, may wish to enjoy it several times throughout the all-too-fleeting peach season.

Cuppa Cuppa Cuppa Cobbler --  sweet peaches, a novel yet easy preparation, and those crispy edges make this seasonal dessert a perennial favorite!

The recipe’s catchy name refers to the amount of flour, sugar, and milk included in it.  I first enjoyed this dessert at the home of a childhood friend many years ago, when it was whipped up for last minute guests using canned peaches and a full stick of butter.

Fresh peaches elevate the dish, although the canned variety may certainly be used for an easy winter treat. (In this case, drain them first.) As for the butter, I found that a lesser quantity supplied plenty of flavor and a nice crispy edge without the hint of greasiness I sometimes noticed in the original recipe.

Though intended and typically enjoyed as an after-dinner dessert, Dad considers this treat akin to a donut and occasionally enjoys a serving after his daily bowl of cornflakes. My mom lights up when I heap in additional fruit—requiring extra cooking time and occasionally resulting in overflow!

Cuppa Cuppa Cuppa Cobbler --  sweet peaches, a novel yet easy preparation, and those crispy edges make this seasonal dessert a perennial favorite!
Cuppa Cuppa Cuppa Cobbler
Yield: 6-8 servings
With a layer of melted butter, batter, and fruit, this simple recipe strays from the typical two-layer cobbler with fruit on the bottom and a crumble or biscuit on top. Then, as this cobbler bakes, the batter rises up and over the peaches and forms a cakelike treat, the edges of which become lightly crisped by the melted butter.
Ingredients
  • 6 tablespoons butter
  • 1 cup (4.5 ounces/127 grams) all-purpose flour (may substitute an all-purpose gluten-free flour blend)
  • 1 cup (192 grams) granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • scant 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 cup (240 ml) milk of choice
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 cups peeled and chopped peaches (from 2-3 large peaches; see notes)
  • Optional: cinnamon sugar; ice cream or whipped cream for serving
Instructions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Place the butter (as is–you will melt this soon) in an 8-inch square or similar size baking dish. Set aside.

Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt in a medium bowl. Add the milk and vanilla, stirring just until the dry ingredients are thoroughly combined. As you are finishing up with the batter, place the baking dish in the oven to melt the butter. (You don’t want the butter to burn, so avoid putting the dish in the oven too early.It should take about 4-5 minutes to melt cold butter.)

Once the butter has fully melted, remove the baking dish from the oven, and pour the batter over the melted butter. Do not stir.

Evenly distribute the chopped peaches over the batter. Again, do not stir. Sprinkle with a little cinnamon sugar, if desired. (I use about 1 1/2 teaspoons of sugar and 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon, but you can eyeball it or skip it entirely.)

Bake the cobbler for 35 to 45 minutes. The batter will rise up and around the peaches as it cooks. You’ll know the cobbler is cooked throughout when the edges are a deep golden brown. Check a few minutes early and adjust the time if necessary, as all ovens vary.

Serve the cobbler warm or at room temperature, with a scoop of optional ice cream or whipped cream.To best preserve freshness, cover and refrigerate any leftovers.

Notes & Tips

When peaches are very ripe, the skins will often peel off easily. If this isn’t the case, score an “X” on one end, and then immerse in boiling water for 30-40 seconds. The edges of the “X” will begin to peel back. At this point, the skins will peel off easily.

Canned and drained peaches may be used when fresh aren’t available.

A few more things:

  • This recipe has proved to be fairly flexible over the years.  For instance, I’ve baked the cobbler at 375 degrees F, reducing the cooking time slightly.  For a bit of caramelized sweetness, I’ve sprinkled a tablespoon or so of additional sugar over the surface at the end of baking time and broiled for a minute or two, watching very closely to avoid burning.
  • I’ve also varied the pan size.  I tend to use an 8-inch square or similar size rectangular dish (pictured) because I like the batter to be a bit deeper, but I’ve actually baked a thinner version in a 9×13 pan and it did work.
  • I’ve added extra fruit (in this case, watch for overflow and place a baking sheet under your pan for added insurance!), and mixed the peaches with a variety of berries.  As always, be sure to monitor closely if you deviate from the recipe.
The Fountain Avenue Kitchen https://fountainavenuekitchen.com/

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Comments

  1. Heather Jane

    Ann, how do you think this recipe would fare if I halved it and used an 8- or 9-inch square pan? We love peaches here, but there are just two of us!

    Reply
    1. Ann Post author

      I’ve made the full recipe in a 9×13 pan and it was thinner but worked well. Based on that I’d say halving the recipe and baking in an 8-inch square pan would be the way to go. Just check the time a little early. And feel free to report back!

      Reply
      1. Heather Jane

        Thanks Ann! I realize now that I misread your instructions, which call for an 8-inch pan. I think I’ll try it with something smaller, and I’ll let you know.

        Reply
        1. Ann Post author

          It would actually be interesting to try half a recipe in a 9×5 loaf pan if you have one of those. The recipe would be a little thicker as the adjusted proportions would be cooked in a slightly deeper pan, but it could work quite well!

          Reply
  2. Mary Chairs

    Great recipe! I bought peaches on Friday thinking I would make a traditional cobbler or crumble with oatmeal, butter and brown sugar. This recipe showed up in my mailbox at the right moment. I’m with your dad on this one – I’m having leftovers with my tea this morning. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
    1. Ann Post author

      Sounds like the perfect way to start a Sunday morning, Mary! So happy the timing worked out so well and that you enjoyed!

      Reply
    1. Ann Post author

      Hi Meg, I mention using an 8×8″ or similar size dish, and the pictured dish is actually a small rectangle with the same area. As I mention in the notes, this recipe is quite flexible so you could use a bigger dish. That said, I do prefer the thicker end result achieved when using the smaller size that’s stated. Hope that helps!   

      Reply
  3. Trudy

    Hi Ann, Is it really a Tablespoon of baking of baking powder? That sounds like a lot for the amount of flour!

    Reply
    1. Ann Post author

      It’s funny Trudy… As many parts of this recipe that I’ve toyed with over the years, I’ve always kept the 1 tablespoon of baking powder (as it appeared in my original recipe) constant. I never notice an off taste and think it helps the batter rise up and around the fruit. That said, I might try it next time with a teaspoon less, just to see if I can detect any difference!

      Reply
  4. Elaine

    Ann I’m making this for a crowd. Is it ok to double and bake in a 9×13 or do you recommend making two 8×8? Also, is there any particular variety of peach you think works especially well in this recipe? Since it is peach season I thought I would ask. Thank you so much for all the wonderful recipes. Your site is my go to and I use it several times a weeks.

    Reply
    1. Ann Post author

      Hi Elaine, First, thank you for the kind words. I am delighted you’re a “regular!” I wouldn’t hesitate to bake this in a 9×13 unless you want more of the crispy edges. That would be one advantage of baking in two smaller pans. The pan size and oven temp are somewhat flexible, so you can fiddle a little either way depending on what you have to work with — i.e., a 9×9 pan, raising the oven temp to 375 if you cook in a larger pan and you think it needs a little more browning (and a doubled batch would likely need a few more minutes in the oven), etc. As for peaches, I have two favorite places to buy peaches locally, and they are always good, no matter the variety. I’ve even used white peaches, which can be so delicious, too. I hope that helps and that the cobbler is enjoyed by all!

      Reply
  5. Dee Mittie

    I’ve made this recipe numerous times and it is oh-so-easy to whip up and it’s absolutely delicious!! I noticed you said your dad went to Cherry Hill Orchards, I was raised in Lancaster Co. ( moved away years ago) but still have family we visit. We love to roam the countryside for these wonderful markets, and Roots Market is one of our favorites for getting fresh, local fruits, veggies, and assorted delicious goodies!!

    Reply
    1. Ann Post author

      So nice to make the Lancaster connected, Dee! Roots is another great spot — we’re truly spoiled here. I’m thrilled the cobbler has become an easy favorite and truly appreciate your comment!

      Reply
  6. Bertie Post author

    That cuppa cuppa cuppa was so YUMMY! I added chopped pecans and shredded coconut to the batter….

    Reply
    1. Ann Post author

      So happy you made and enjoyed, Elizabeth! This is the time of year I get a little sad because the end of peach season is so near!

      Reply