Honey Lollipops — a Natural Sore Throat Remedy

In the past few months, I have read several times about the antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-fungal properties of honey and cinnamon.  I am certainly not a doctor, but when I saw the idea from my friend, Justine, at Full Belly Sisters for a honey lollipop that was supposed to soothe a sore throat, I figured it was worth a try.  If nothing else, it would taste good!

Because of what I read, I added cinnamon to the lollipops.  After making them, I let the kids and their friends sample the home remedy—they got good reviews in the taste department–then put the rest away for when the next cold struck.  When my older son got the knock-out-drag-down flu recently, we put them to the test. He reported that the honey concoction soothed his sore throat and asked for them several times over the next few days.  Whether it was truly an effective natural medicine or a placebo effect, we were both pleased with the results.

For a child who is at least two years old, these would be a good alternative to a cough drop, which may pose a choking hazard.  Conversely, you could make these as a cough drop, simply omitting the stick, for an adult or older child.  If you end up with more lollipops than you need to sooth a sore throat, they will keep indefinitely stored in a cool, dry place and may also be used as a sweetener/stirrer in a cup of hot tea.  I highly recommend making them in advance and having them on hand for the next time a soar throat strikes…and please let me know what you think!

Honey Lollipops — a Natural Sore Throat Remedy
My yield was 13 lollipops, although this may vary somewhat depending on how large you make them. An inexpensive candy thermometer, available in most grocery and kitchen stores, makes these especially easy to prepare.
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Ingredients
  1. 1/3 cup honey
  2. ¼ teaspoon cinnamon, optional
  3. Lollipop sticks (available at craft stores)
Instructions
  1. Lay the lollipop sticks on a parchment paper-covered baking sheet.
  2. Pour the honey into a small saucepan and boil over medium-low to medium heat for about 10 minutes or until the temperature on your candy thermometer reads 300 degrees F. The honey will bubble up. Adjust the heat so that the honey continues to bubble but does not boil over, stirring occasionally. (If you do not have a thermometer, you may test the honey for doneness by dropping a drip or two into a bowl of very cold water. If the honey hardens into a ball, it is ready. If it remains soft to the touch, return to a boil.)
  3. Once the honey has reached 300 degrees F., remove the pan from the burner. Stir the honey and allow it to cool for a minute or two in the pan. Add the cinnamon, if using, and stir to thoroughly incorporate.
  4. Slowly pour the still-hot mixture over one end of the lollipop sticks. When the honey is very hot, it will spread out and form an uneven circle. Your first few lollipops might be thin and misshapen. As the honey cools, it becomes easier to pour an even circle. If desired, you may even out the first few lollipops by pouring a little more honey over them at the end. The thinner lollipops may be a little sharp around the edges once the honey hardened, so I would recommend making them thicker. Additionally, if your honey cools to the point that it becomes hard to pour, simply return to low heat for a minute or so to thin.
  5. Once completely cooled, wrap in clear, plastic treat bags and secure with a twist-tie or simply store in an air-tight container, separating the lollipops with a piece of wax or parchment paper.
Notes
  1. Note to parents with kids who have braces: As the lollipops are sucked on, the honey softens and, like taffy, would most likely not be orthodontist approved. If your child likes tea, he or she could instead use the lollipop as a sweet stirrer in the tea.
The Fountain Avenue Kitchen https://fountainavenuekitchen.com/

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Comments

    1. Ann

      Hi Bibi,
      I was so happy I had these on hand when my son got sick. He really felt they helped. Coincidently, my pediatrician just cited a study that demonstrated honey lozenges effectiveness over all the other over-the-counter remedies!

      Reply
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  2. nettie moore

    Thank you Ann for sharing these with me, I just made them with the honey and cinnamon, over cooked the first batch, used wax paper (they stick to wax paper), just made the second batch used parchment paper as suggested, waiting to cool and give them to my daughter, she has mono, since that is viral I used the cinnamon. Thank you sweetie!!

    Reply
    1. Ann

      So glad the second batch worked better and I really hope they help, Nettie. Thank you for the feedback about wax paper, as I have only used parchment. Sending speedy recovery wishes to your daughter. xo

      Reply
  3. Heather

    Do you think these would work in a candy mold? Just for the purpose of having a fun shape? I was worried about getting them to “pop” out of the mold.

    Reply
    1. Ann

      I think they would work well, Heather. I wanted to make them without since some people don’t have molds. Just to be sure, you could very lightly grease the molds the first time. If you try, I would love to hear how you make out!

      Reply
    1. Ann

      I have read that most of the enzymes in honey are heat stable, yet that is why some people prefer to buy raw honey. Whether it is a placebo effect or a true remedy, honey in tea and as a throat lozenge does seem to have a positive effect!

      Reply
  4. zoe

    When using raw, organic (local) honey you must be careful when heating. Heating honey will kill the good bacteria fighting spores and reder it useless. Low heat, no boiling. I have been told when adding honey to tea/hot water for drinking to wait until the liquid is at a drinkable temperature so as not to kills all the good spores. So some adjustments may be needed to the rescipe. But it sounds yummy.

    Reply
    1. Ann

      Thanks very much for your comments, Zoe. I made a few comments regarding this in the comment above. Just to be sure, it might make sense to save raw honey for non-cooking purposes. If you try, I hope they help!

      Reply
  5. Carissa

    I was just following a recipe today that said “Heat slowly and on very low heat so you don’t ruin the raw properties of the honey”. ^^ now i see the comments above. I’m sure it can duplicated on “low and slow”. Definitely going to give it a try! 🙂

    Reply
  6. Molly

    Do you think freezing these would be possible? I saw one of the above comments asked about using a mold, so what do you think would happen if I, say, poured them into an ice cube trAy and froze them? Or would they just get all sticky and gross? Thank you! I have a sore throat and will DEFINITELY try this out 🙂

    Reply
    1. Ann

      That’s a good question, Molly. I store mine in the fridge, and I’m trying to imagine what a higher degree of cold would do to the honey. If you try, please report back…and I hope they help your sore throat!

      Reply
  7. Deb

    Have you tried adding ginger or licorice root to it? I know those two ingredients are known for soothing sore throats. Was wondering if you have information on if including those two additional additional ingredients would be safe for all ages.

    Reply
    1. Ann

      Hi Deb,
      I have not added either to these lollipops but would love to know if you try. Fresh ginger may create a texture that some don’t care for. I have not used licorice root before. Perhaps if someone else tries they will comment as well.

      Reply
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        1. Ann

          I think that’s it, Melanke. Maybe your burner heat just didn’t get the temperature up in that amount of time. You could try increasing the heat slightly the next time. The process of candy making is rather persnickety and really does rely on temperature. If you try again, let me know how you make out!

          Reply
    1. Ann

      I wouldn’t bother to use raw organic honey for this recipe for that reason. The soothing properties, however, when using regular honey are still helpful!

      Reply