Cinnamon Sugar Pumpkin Seeds

By Ann Fulton

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Sugar and spice and everything nice, these crispy seeds offer a snack-worthy way to make the most of your annual pumpkin carving ritual. Taking the time to dry out the seeds, as described in the recipe notes, will create the crispiest, most flavorful seeds.

Sugar and spice and everything nice, these crispy seeds offer a snack-worthy way to make the most of your annual pumpkin carving ritual. Taking the time to dry out the seeds, as described in the recipe notes, will create the crispiest, most flavorful seeds.

 

As we were picking pumpkins last weekend, my older son commented that this may be his last year carving pumpkins. I firmly believe that one is never too old to carve pumpkins, but next year he will likely be in college during our annual family ritual. (Boo hoo!)

I’m pretty sure there will be a care package sent to wherever he ends up (he’s just starting to work on the applications) that includes a batch of roasted pumpkin seeds.

The classic salted version has been a favorite fall snack in our house for years. More recently, we’ve also enjoyed a lightly sweet alternative.  

When envisioning this snack, I had thoughts of my brother’s favorite childhood breakfast cereal–Cinnamon Toast Crunch. Back in the day, I skipped the milk and occasionally snacked on the crispy, cinnamon sugar-coated pieces by the handful.

For the pumpkin seeds, I combined that inspiration with my Spiced Pecan recipe, thinking that a simple swap of nuts for seeds would be a sure thing. Ultimately, it took some tweaking, but the end result was a snack that everyone enjoyed.

🎃     🎃      🎃      🎃      🎃      🎃      🎃      🎃   

Did you know?  Pumpkin seeds are rich in essential minerals like zinc and magnesium, nutrients which help build muscle and fend off disease. Sometimes referred to as pepitas, pumpkin seeds also contain mono-unsaturated fatty acids, which are helpful in lowering LDL cholesterol and increasing the more desirable HDL cholesterol. Pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of Vitamin E and B-complex vitamins as well.

For a savory, lightly salted variation on this recipe, you may also enjoy classic Roasted Pumpkin Seeds.

Sugar and spice and everything nice, these crispy seeds offer a snack-worthy way to make the most of your annual pumpkin carving ritual. Taking the time to dry out the seeds, as described in the recipe notes, will create the crispiest, most flavorful seeds.

The fun begins…

Sugar and spice and everything nice, these crispy seeds offer a snack-worthy way to make the most of your annual pumpkin carving ritual. Taking the time to dry out the seeds, as described in the recipe notes, will create the crispiest, most flavorful seeds.

Taking the time to dry out the seeds prior to baking will make for more even crisping. It also means you can roast them a day or more after carving the pumpkins if that’s more convenient. If you have enough seeds, you may enjoy making two batches–one sweet and one salty. Classic Roasted Pumpkin Seeds require just two additional ingredients–oil and salt–although you may customize with spices like curry or chili powder, if desired.     

Sugar and spice and everything nice, these crispy seeds offer a snack-worthy way to make the most of your annual pumpkin carving ritual. Taking the time to dry out the seeds, as described in the recipe notes, will create the crispiest, most flavorful seeds.

Two tablespoons of sugar combine with a very short list of additional ingredients to coat the seeds before baking.

Sugar and spice and everything nice, these crispy seeds offer a snack-worthy way to make the most of your annual pumpkin carving ritual. Taking the time to dry out the seeds, as described in the recipe notes, will create the crispiest, most flavorful seeds.

Once coated, transfer the seeds to a parchment-lined baking sheet and spread them into an even layer.

Sugar and spice and everything nice, these crispy seeds offer a snack-worthy way to make the most of your annual pumpkin carving ritual. Taking the time to dry out the seeds, as described in the recipe notes, will create the crispiest, most flavorful seeds.

The end result is perfectly-crisped seeds (they will feel dry–not sticky) with a golden, lightly-sweet coating. Thanks to the low oven temperature, the coating won’t easily burn as can be the tendency when sugar is involved.  

For more Halloween food fun, you may enjoy easy recipes for Spooky Spaghetti Stuffed Peppers, Spider Dogs (a pasta dish that kids and adults enjoy), Clementine Jack-o’-lanterns, and classic, lightly salted Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

Cinnamon Sugar Pumpkin Seeds
Yield: 1½+ seeds
Crunchy with a delightful balance of sweetness and spice, this variation on traditional salted pumpkin seeds offers a snack-worthy way to make the most of your annual pumpkin carving ritual. Taking the time to dry out the seeds, as described in the recipe notes, will create the crispiest, most flavorful seeds.
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons (24g) granulated sugar
  • ¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1½ cups pumpkin seeds, dried out (see notes)
  • 1½ tablespoons (22g) melted butter or coconut oil
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 300℉, and line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. In a small bowl, mix together the sugar, cinnamon, and salt. Set aside.
  3. Place the seeds in a mixing bowl, drizzle with the melted butter or coconut oil, and toss to evenly coat. Sprinkle the cinnamon mixture evenly over the seeds, and toss again to evenly coat. Spread the seeds in a single layer on the prepared baking sheet.
  4. Bake, stirring every 10-15 minutes, until the seeds are toasted and lightly browned. This may take anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour, depending on how long you allowed the seeds to dry before baking. After the first 30 minutes, reduce the heat to 250℉, as the lower temperature will ensure the sugar doesn’t burn if the seeds need more time to dry and crisp.  Note that the seeds will continue to crisp as they cool.
  5. Once toasted, remove the seeds from the oven and allow them to cool on the baking sheet. Once thoroughly cool, store the seeds in an airtight container at room temperature, where they will stay fresh for at least 2 weeks.
Notes

Drying out the seeds: Allowing the pumpkin seeds to dry out, at least partially, before baking will allow them to crisp faster and more evenly. It will also allow the butter and sugar mixture to better adhere to the seeds. To do this, spread the seeds out on a baking sheet and allow them to dry for at least several hours, stirring occasionally and spreading into an even layer again. For even better results, refrigerate the seeds (spread in an even layer and uncovered) for up to 3 days, stirring periodically and spreading back out, to evenly dry them.

The scoop on the goop: Remove the big pieces of orange goop from the seeds before roasting, but don’t worry if some of it still clings to the seeds. It will add extra flavor to the seeds and can be picked off easily once the seeds are cooked. (In our house, the seeds that have some of the crisped goop attached are actually considered a treat and disappear quickly!)

The Fountain Avenue Kitchen https://fountainavenuekitchen.com/

Recipe first shared October 12, 2016

Pumpkins

Never to old to carve pumpkins!  

 

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Comments

  1. Mary Lou Keller

    Good morning Ann! I was looking for your salted and roasted pumpkin seed recipe and found this. I have the salted ones in the oven, but I’m going to make another batch with this recipe. I bought a bag of raw pumpkin seeds at Costco yesterday so I’m making a couple of batches of these for nice healthy snacks.

    I’ll let you know how the cinnamon ones turn out.
    It’s a gorgeous fall day here and we hope to get out and do some hiking.
    Take care Ann!

    Reply
    1. Ann Post author

      Buying the raw seeds at Costco saves the work of digging them out of the pumpkin…great thought! Are they the smaller pepitas or the bigger seeds from the carving pumpkins? I might need to make a trip!

      Reply
      1. Mary Lou Keller

        They are indeed the smaller Pepitas Ann! We have not bought a big pumpkin in a long time. We have a small one at home (not sure if it’s just small or a pie pumpkin) that we have not carved.

        Do you have a suggestion for a favorite salad to use the seeds for? They really are SO good!!

        Reply
        1. Ann Post author

          I often substitute them for nuts in a variety of salads. Here are a few ideas that you may like!
          https://fountainavenuekitchen.com/roasted-root-veggie-salad-with-apple-cider-vinaigrette/
          https://fountainavenuekitchen.com/beet-salad/
          https://fountainavenuekitchen.com/harvest-bowls/
          https://fountainavenuekitchen.com/kale-salad-with-sweet-potato-apple-2/

          I could keep going (Fall Slaw!) but I don’t want to overwhelm you. Let me know if you’re looking for anything special!

          Reply
  2. Edie Post author

    These are absolutely delicious. I’ve made your original recipe every year since you shared it. This is such a nice option–sweet but without too much sugar. Thank you!

    Reply
  3. Shalee

    I usually do with traditional toasted pumpkin seeds or a curry/spicy version.

    I’m so excited to try these this year! Thank you for your recipe!

    -Shalee

    Reply
  4. Amy

    Ok these are so yummy ! I was regretting cooking my own pumpkin for my pumpkin pie/ then these came
    Into my life. Game changer I tell you!

    Reply