Prep-Ahead Seeded Oatmeal “Packets”

By Ann Fulton

Hemp, flax, and chia seeds add fiber, fat, and protein to these DIY packets, and toppings like peanut butter, jelly, applesauce, and granola make them absolutely delicious!
Jump to Recipe

A trio of seeds adds fiber, fat, and protein to these DIY packets, and toppings like peanut butter, jelly, applesauce, and granola make them absolutely delicious!

 

The convenience of an instant oatmeal packet is good, but we can make it better–and more filling–by adding a few key ingredients. These “packets” utilize pantry items, so they can be assembled in advance and kept on hand for grab-and-go ease any day of the week.

The key additions are hemp, flax, and chia seeds, which notably supply a variety of fiber, fat, and protein. The combination subtly enhances flavor, but what I most appreciate is that the upgraded oatmeal keeps me full longer than plain oatmeal.

At the same time, the seeds are a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids, lignans, Vitamin E,  magnesium, additional fiber (the oats are good for this too), and a variety of other antioxidants and minerals.

So how do the seeds, with their subtle flavor, make the oatmeal better tasting and more filling?

Oats alone are fiber-rich but low in fat and not especially high in protein. Fat and protein are metabolized slowly and give our bodies a feeling of satiety. Fat also carries flavor, which means it will heighten the impact of a sweet (or even savory) addition. So, if you like to add brown sugar or maple syrup to your oatmeal, you may find you are able to use less and enjoy the oatmeal as much or more—while staying full longer.

Again, the flavor difference is small, but the seeds do provide a hint of nuttiness (albeit in a nut-free manner). The seeds are also either ground or quite tiny, so the textural difference is subtle.

Hemp, flax, and chia seeds add fiber, fat, and protein to the DIY packets, and toppings like peanut butter, jelly, applesauce, and granola make them absolutely delicious!

Of the three seeds, hemp seeds are likely the most unfamiliar to many people. In case you’re inclined to skip them, I should note that they are my favorite, adding a buttery undertone to the oats. If you do skip any of the seeds, simply add additional oats in their place.

 

Should I use instant, quick, or old-fashioned rolled oats?

As far as the oats are concerned, I prefer to use quick oats, not instant. Quick oats cook faster than rolled oats but are thicker and have more texture than instant oats. Rolled oats or old-fashioned oats, which are thicker yet, work well too. When prepared, the quick oats will be a creamier and rolled oats will be slightly more toothsome. 

Should I prepare the oats with milk or water?

Either will work, but milk will provide a bit more flavor, and possibly protein and sweetness, depending on chosen variety. Milk will also create a creamier end result, while water produces a more toothsome outcome. So, if you like the creamiest possible oats, use quick oats and milk. For the most toothsome oatmeal, opt for water and rolled oats. Feel free to experiment.

When making overnight oats, I recommend using milk, not water. 

Helpful hint: Milk is more likely than water to bubble up and boil over when cooking in the microwave. Especially when using old fashioned oats, which are a touch slower to absorb the moisture than quick oats, choose a container that allows far more room than you think you need (I use an over-sized mug), and watch closely as the milk begins to boil.

What’s the best way to cook the oatmeal?

This method was designed to be fast, so it relies on either a microwave or boiled water. However, if you’d prefer to cook on the stovetop, you may absolutely prepare the seeded mix that way.

Can I meal prep this recipe?

Absolutely. I often use zip-top bags or reusable jars (as pictured below) to prepare and store individual “packets.” Though you can easily combine the dry ingredients as needed, advance assembly makes mealtime especially effortless. Keep a stash on hand, just as you would a box purchased from the grocery store.

Hemp, flax, and chia seeds add fiber, fat, and protein to these DIY packets, and toppings like peanut butter, jelly, applesauce, and granola make them absolutely delicious!

How do I customize to taste?

I’m a firm believe that minor adjustments and enhancements can take a meal from good to great. As such, “customize to taste” is a term I use frequently and back up with suggestions in my recipes.

Palates and preferences vary so much from one person to the next (despite the saying, one size doesn’t fit all!). So in the case of this oatmeal recipe, I offer a variety of common ingredients that may be stirred in or sprinkled on top upon serving. 

My favorites? For the sweet and salty combination, I love a spoonful of peanut butter and chopped banana, jam, pumpkin butter, or homemade applesauce. Sometimes, I add a tablespoon of raisins or chopped dates to the oat mix.

Fruit puree or a little piece of dried fruit in each spoonful is an excellent way to sweeten oatmeal naturally. The creamy, salty flavor of peanut butter, combined with its wholesome fats, also helps a little sweetness from other sources go a longer way.

Possible toppings and mix-ins:

  • Peanut butter (or nut or seed butter of choice)
  • Sliced banana (alternatively, mashing in an overripe banana–or adding chopped pieces–before heating will add natural sweetness to each bite)
  • Blueberries, strawberries, peaches, or other fresh fruit of choice
  • Jam or jelly (Click here if inspired to make your own. I have many recipes, some traditional, others with no sugar.) 
  • Maple syrup, brown sugar, or sweetener of choice
  • Applesauce
  • Apple Butter
  • Pumpkin Butter
  • Raisins or chopped dried fruit of choice
  • Almonds, walnuts, pecans, and other nuts/seeds of choice
  • Granola (So many good ones! Click here to see more granola recipes.)
  • Scalloped apples
  • Easy Blueberry Lemon (or Lime) Sauce–This is my latest favorite. A spoonful is delicious stirred into the oatmeal, and I especially enjoy it in the overnight oats preparation described in the recipe card. 
Hemp, flax, and chia seeds add fiber, fat, and protein to these DIY packets, and toppings like peanut butter, jelly, applesauce, and granola make them absolutely delicious!

What if I don’t like hot oatmeal?

Good news! You can enjoy these oats cold. To make “overnight oats,” simply add a milk of choice to the mixture the night before, give it a good stir, cover, and refrigerate overnight. In the morning, add desired mix-ins/toppings, and enjoy. I like to mix overnight oats in a Mason jar, which doubles as a bowl. It also travels well.

My favorite add-ins when making overnight oats are ½ cup blueberries (fresh or frozen) and/or a small banana, which I chop for a little natural sweetness in each bite. I do add a drizzle of maple syrup and often a tablespoon of chopped almonds. Most recently, I discovered that 1½ to 2 tablespoons of pomegranate seeds (again, frozen works well here–(I add them along with the berries) adds even more flavor a pop of crunchy texture.  

How to melt peanut butter:

While adding a spoonful of peanut butter works well–the hot oatmeal will melt it and allow you to swirl it in easily–melting is a fun alternative. For a drizzle-able consistency, put a dollop or two of peanut butter into a small, microwavable bowl or ramekin, and microwave on high for 20 seconds. Give it a quick stir, and microwave for 20 seconds more. That’s it! Any leftover peanut butter can be left in the bowl and covered, where it will keep just like the peanut butter in the jar.

Hemp, flax, and chia seeds add fiber, fat, and protein to these DIY packets, and toppings like peanut butter, jelly, applesauce, and granola make them absolutely delicious!

Preparing individual oatmeal “packets” and bolstering them with seeds and a few choice add-ins creates a speedy, super satisfying breakfast that may be enjoyed hot or cold. 

Hemp, flax, and chia seeds add fiber, fat, and protein to these DIY packets, and toppings like peanut butter, jelly, applesauce, and granola make them absolutely delicious!

Topping options abound. I like a spoonful of peanut butter and something sweet, like chopped banana, applesauce, or pumpkin butter. Let personal preference guide you. For added flavor and staying power along with a little nostalgia, PB&J fans may enjoy swirling in a spoonful of strawberry or grape jam and peanut butter.

Prep-Ahead Seeded Oatmeal “Packets”
Prep Time: 3 minutes
Cook Time: 2 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes
Yield: 1 serving (easy to scale up and make “packets” to have on hand)
A trio of seeds adds fiber, fat, and protein to this satisfying oatmeal, which can be enjoyed hot or as cold overnight oats. Toppings like peanut butter, jelly, applesauce, and granola make it absolutely delicious!
Ingredients
  • ⅓ cup (30g) quick or old fashioned oats (not instant oats)
  • 1 tablespoon (7g) ground flaxseed
  • 1 tablespoon (9g) hemp seeds
  • ½ tablespoon (6g) chia seeds
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ⅛ kosher salt*
  • ¾-1 cup (180-240ml) milk of choice (start with ¾ cup; may use water)
  • Optional add-ins: maple syrup or brown sugar; bananas; berries; a spoonful of peanut butter or nut butter of choice; jelly or jam; apple butter or pumpkin butter; applesauce or scalloped apples; raisins or chopped dates; chopped nuts or seeds
Instructions

For hot oatmeal: In a large, microwaveable mug or bowl, mix the oats, ground flaxseed, hemp seeds, chia seeds, cinnamon, and salt. Helpful hint: The container needs to be at least twice the volume of the dry oat mixture to allow room for expansion. Especially when cooking in the microwave with milk, more room is helpful to prevent boiling over.

Prep-ahead tips: For oatmeal packets at the ready, you may mix as many servings of the dry ingredients as desired. Simply add to individual zip-top bags, reusable plastic containers, or glass jars with lids. The dry packets will keep in a cool, dry place for several months. If you are using a granulated sweetener or dried fruit, you may add them to the dry mix or use as a topping. For their natural sweetness, I often add a tablespoon of raisins to the packets.

To prepare oatmeal in the microwave: Add ¾ cup milk or water and stir to combine. Microwave on high for one minute, stir, then microwave in 30 second intervals until thickened. Add the additional liquid, a splash at a time, to reach your desired consistency. (Total time is 90 seconds in my microwave for quick oats and 2 minutes for old fashioned oats, but microwaves do vary.) Let the cooked oatmeal sit at room temperature for about 2 minutes; it will plump and thicken further. Top with or stir in extra ingredients of choice and enjoy.

To prepare oatmeal with boiling water: Add ¾ cup boiling water and stir. Cover and let stand for 2-4 minutes to soften and thicken; stir, adding a little more water or milk to loosen, if needed.

To prepare cold overnight oats: I prefer milk over water and the thicker cut of old fashioned oats for this preparation, although quick oats will work. Add ¾ milk (or start with ⅔ cup if you prefer a thicker consistency) to the dry ingredients, stir to combine, and then refrigerate for 8 hours or up to 3-4 days. Add another splash or two of milk upon serving to loosen the oats, if desired, and stir in any add-ins. Serving suggestions: With this method, I often add a drizzle of maple syrup, ½ cup of blueberries and/or chopped banana, and 1 tablespoon of toasted, slivered almonds. A mix of vanilla yogurt and milk is appealing too.

Notes

*Adding a pinch of salt to oatmeal subtly enhances the flavor, although you may absolutely omit if watching sodium intake.

More On YouTube More on Instagram
Tried this recipe?Post a picture on instagram and we will repost it! Mention @fountainavenuekitchen or tag #fountainavenuekitchen!
The Fountain Avenue Kitchen https://fountainavenuekitchen.com/

 

Leave a Reply

Make it? Rate the recipe:

Your email address will not be published.